Museumofworldmusic.com

Instruments

South America

Name: Bandurria.

Type: Plucked Short Necked Lute > Chordophone.

Region: Europe > Peru > South America.

Luthier: De Jorge Bellido ~ Araquipa Department, Peru, December 1954.

Dimensions: Scale length 375 mm.

Acquisition Date: 2006.12.27 Thursday.

Acquisition Source: Rene Hugo Sanchez.

BandurriaDescription: The bandurria is a plucked short-necked lute and a member of the chordophone family of musical instruments. It has its origins in the Iberian peninsula in Spain and its close relatives are the bandolla, bandolin, laud and the mandolin and cittern. The term bandurria comes from the text "Libro De Buen Amor [the book of good love] a manuscript by Juan Ruiz [1283-1350]. The bandurria was widely distributed from Latin America, South America and to the Philippines. In Medieval Spain the original instrument was constructed from a body covered by animal, neck and it had three or more strings. A Renaissance era book published by Fray Juan Bermudo [1520-1565]. Frey documented the following changes made to the bandurria. Tunings for this early form of bandurria were B G B or B A B in single strings. During the 15th century the use of a plectrum was abandoned. In its current form the bandurria has a much shorter length measured in total from the bottom to the head stock. The body of the Spanish bandurria is slighter wider and has a more present tear drop profile. Up to 12 to 16 frets are installed on the fingerboard and usually is complete with 12 strings. During the 1930s the musician Paco Aguilar had a custom made bass bandurria called a Laudon.

The Bandurria in Peru: In colonial era Peru the the bandurria arrived to Peru from Spain via Cuba through Latin America often accompanying a dance called the “zapateo”. The bandurria occupied a predominant role in the Afro Peruvian communities through Lima and near by Coastal Peru. Today the bandurria has a strong presence in the Cusco, Apurimac and Arequipa regions of Peru. In Peru one would find the bandurria to have the strings arranged in 12, 14, 16 or 20 courses. A much larger type of bandurria called a marimacho bandurria it is found only in the city of Cusco and its department. In Spanish the word “marimacho” translates into “hermaphrodite”. The marimacho bandurria is tuned a fifth below from the prima bandurrias and it is considered a soloists instrument.

Anatomy of the bandurria:The body of the bandurria is constructed from cedar or sycamore. The neck of the bandurria is constructed from walnut, often maple or ebony is used for the construction the fingerboard. Wooden friction tuning gears may often be still used on some bandurrias in rurual communities. Mechanical machine gear tuners are often installed into professional grade bandurrias.

Bandurria Tunings
Spain, Standard
C G D E A B
Spain, Boroque
G# C# F# B E
Spain, Pre rennaissance
B G B or B A B
Spain, Rennaissance (5 course)
C F B A E
Spain, Laudon (Paco Aguilar)
G D A E B F#
Bandurria - Peru 4 course (16-stringed)
Maolin
E G# B E
Apruimac
G C E A
Cusqueño / Huamagino
D G B E
Ayacucho
C E A E
Carnival
E C G E
Anomino (anonymous)
E A B E

 

Citations: Bibliography - The New Grove Dictionary of Music Page. 148 by Stanley Sadie > Online Resources > pacoweb.net > altlasofpluckedinstruments.com / western Europe > Trio Assai (Spanish bandurria ensemble) > Los Instrumentos De Plectro Espanol [in Spanish].